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July 2014
30
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nadinenihongo:

Guide to Self-Studying Japanese
A large proportion of Japanese learners self-study. Finding places to learn Japanese in a classroom environment can be difficult and expensive. Here’s a guide on how you can learn Japanese for free and from the comfort of your sofa.

When learning Japanese, the most important step is to learn Hiragana and Katakana, the writing alphabets of Japanese.
The best way I’ve found to do that is to make flashcards. Make sure you practice writing as well as recognizing them, this will not only be a great skill to have but will also reinforce the shapes in your mind.
Resources:
[Hiragana 42], the best guide I’ve found to learn the Hiragana (in a day!)[Hiranana and Katakana Quiz Site][Kana Invaders Game][Anki] An amazing program that will make sure you never forget any Kana….

The next step is to start learning vocabulary. Where can you find what to learn? Use a site like Memrise to find word lists (for example, there is a word list for all the vocabulary in starter textbooks like Genki), and use the amazing interface to learn them and keep them in your long term memory.
Resources:
[Memrise] as mentioned above to find and learn vocabulary lists.[Most Common Words List][Anki] An amazing program that will make sure you never forget any Vocabulary….

While encountering vocabulary, you’re likely to be coming across super-complicated-looking Kanji. You can learn Kanji through Memrise as above, but there are some other websites that may be of interest.
Resources:
[Kanji Damage] A great site where you can learn Kanji through mnemonics.[WaniKani] by the same people who make TextFugu can help you learn Kanji from scratch.[Anki] An amazing program that will make sure you never forget any Kanji….

The next step is to apply that new vocabulary to grammar points and start making sentences.
If you can’t get your hands on textbooks like Genki, don’t fear! There are a lot of great online grammar resources.
Resources:
[TextFugu] a highly rated ‘online textbook’ which will guide you right from the beginning of learning Japanese.[Guide to Japanese] another online textbook with a lot of grammar points and excellent explanations.

So you probably started to learn Japanese because you have some interest in Japanese media. Time to start using it to your advantage!
Aside from the obvious watching Anime, J-dramas and films, why not try Reading Japanese News? Watching Japanese TV? Just make sure you are making these activities productive - note down new vocabulary, add them to Anki, and keep learning! It’s much easier to learn things you’re interested in.

The most important but difficult part of self-studying Japanese is getting your own compositions checked. Utilize all that grammar and vocabulary and write a short piece, it could be a diary entry or a short essay. Get it recorded for you by a native on RhinoSpike, and checked for grammar and consistencies on Lang-8.These sites also give you the chance to connect with Japanese natives, and perhaps start up some language exchanges!
For more resources, take a look at my Ultimate Resources List

Any more tips? Please submit them here!

nadinenihongo:

Guide to Self-Studying Japanese

A large proportion of Japanese learners self-study. Finding places to learn Japanese in a classroom environment can be difficult and expensive. Here’s a guide on how you can learn Japanese for free and from the comfort of your sofa.

When learning Japanese, the most important step is to learn Hiragana and Katakana, the writing alphabets of Japanese.

The best way I’ve found to do that is to make flashcards. Make sure you practice writing as well as recognizing them, this will not only be a great skill to have but will also reinforce the shapes in your mind.

Resources:

[Hiragana 42], the best guide I’ve found to learn the Hiragana (in a day!)
[Hiranana and Katakana Quiz Site]
[Kana Invaders Game]
[Anki] An amazing program that will make sure you never forget any Kana….

The next step is to start learning vocabulary. Where can you find what to learn? Use a site like Memrise to find word lists (for example, there is a word list for all the vocabulary in starter textbooks like Genki), and use the amazing interface to learn them and keep them in your long term memory.

Resources:

[Memrise] as mentioned above to find and learn vocabulary lists.
[Most Common Words List]
[Anki] An amazing program that will make sure you never forget any Vocabulary….

While encountering vocabulary, you’re likely to be coming across super-complicated-looking Kanji. You can learn Kanji through Memrise as above, but there are some other websites that may be of interest.

Resources:

[Kanji Damage] A great site where you can learn Kanji through mnemonics.
[WaniKani] by the same people who make TextFugu can help you learn Kanji from scratch.
[Anki] An amazing program that will make sure you never forget any Kanji….

The next step is to apply that new vocabulary to grammar points and start making sentences.

If you can’t get your hands on textbooks like Genki, don’t fear! There are a lot of great online grammar resources.

Resources:

[TextFugu] a highly rated ‘online textbook’ which will guide you right from the beginning of learning Japanese.
[Guide to Japanese] another online textbook with a lot of grammar points and excellent explanations.

So you probably started to learn Japanese because you have some interest in Japanese media. Time to start using it to your advantage!

Aside from the obvious watching Anime, J-dramas and films, why not try Reading Japanese News? Watching Japanese TV? Just make sure you are making these activities productive - note down new vocabulary, add them to Anki, and keep learning! It’s much easier to learn things you’re interested in.

The most important but difficult part of self-studying Japanese is getting your own compositions checked. Utilize all that grammar and vocabulary and write a short piece, it could be a diary entry or a short essay. Get it recorded for you by a native on RhinoSpike, and checked for grammar and consistencies on Lang-8.These sites also give you the chance to connect with Japanese natives, and perhaps start up some language exchanges!

For more resources, take a look at my Ultimate Resources List

http://nadinenihongo.tumblr.com/post/47984748297/ultimate-japanese-resources-list

Any more tips? Please submit them here!

#guide   #resources   #self study   #grammar   #kanji   #language   
July 2014
30
Via   •   Source

ネイディーン日本語 ULTIMATE JAPANESE RESOURCES LIST

nadinenihongo:

image

Some resources cover more than one skill or section, so there are duplicates. First, resources are organised by skill, and then there’s some broader sections.

———————————————————————————————-

HIRAGANA & KATAKANA

- English to Katakana Converter
- Kana Invaders 
- Learning Hiragana

KANJI

- Kanji Damage
- WaniKani [Review]
- Memrise [Review]
- Tobira: Gateway to Advanced Japanese [Review] (textbook)
- Renshuu
- Skritter
- Handwritten Kanji Dictionary
- Duke University Kanji Site
- Benefits of writing Kanji 

VOCABULARY

- Memrise [Review]
- Kokugo Jiten [Review] (textbook)
- Tobira: Gateway to Advanced Japanese [Review] (textbook)
-
Common Japanese Collocations: A learner’s guide to frequent word pairings (textbook)
- WordReference Forums (Japanese)
- Renshuu
- 6000 most used words
- Large Phrase List
- Japanese Onomatopoeia
 
- Keigo Cheatsheet

GRAMMAR

- Tobira: Gateway to Advanced Japanese [Review] (textbook)
- Donna Toki, Dou Tsukau [Review](textbook)
-
Nihongo Resources
- JGram
- Renshuu
- TaeKim’s Guide to Japanese
- Tatoeba
- Learn Japanese with Erin

READING
- Read More Or Die
- NHK Easy News [Review]
- Macaronics
- Lang 8
- The Great ChokoChoko Library
- Japanese Reading Practice For Beginners
- Kodomo Asahi (Kid’s Asahi News)

- Yahoo! Kids Japanese Papercraft

- Read Manga Online

- Chunichi Kid’s News

- Real World Japanese

- Japanese Class News Reading

WRITING

- How to write on Japanese essay paper (Genkouyoushi)
- Macaronics
- Lang 8

LISTENING

- Erin’s Challenge!
- RhinoSpike [Review]
- NHK Easy News [Review]
- KeyHole TV (stream live Japanese TV) [Review]
- NHK WORLD TV
- Documentaries About Japan You Can Watch For Free
- Studying with J-Drama
- Nihongo de Kurasou
- Stream Japanese TV Online 

SPEAKING

- RhinoSpike [Review]

———————————————————————————————-

DICTIONARIES/TRANSLATION TOOLS
- Nouben
- Weblio
- Jisho.org
- ALC
- WWWJDIC

JLPT

- TANOS
- ALC JLPT Drills (textbook) 

SOFTWARE

- Anki SRS [Review]

iPHONE APPS

- Japanese

TEXTBOOKS

- Tobira: Gateway to Advanced Japanese [Review]
- Donna Toki, Dou Tsukau [Review]
- Kokugo Jiten [Review]
- My Japanese Bookshelf (several textbooks)

BLOGS
(my recommendations only)

- Japanese-Revision
- Nihongo Log
- Fuck Yeah Native Japanese
- Japanese Through Fandom
- Julie Yumi
- Holy Crap Japanese
- Nihongo Ga Suki
- Tooi Tardis
- MaggieSensei
- CultureJapan (Danny Choo)
- KanjiBlog

EVENTS IN THE UK

- London Japan Matsuri
- DokiDoki Japanese Festival (Manchester)
- Manchester UK Nippon

UK - Japanese Foundations and Societies
If you’re interested in Japan-related lectures, events, activities and meetings, visit these websites to see Japan-related activities in the UK.

British Association for Japanese Studies
Daiwa Foundation
Sasakawa Foundation
The Japan Society

———————————————————————————————-

NOTES:

- Some resources have reviews (listed as links), and others don’t but I hope to review all of the resources on here eventually.
- If you have any suggestions, message me or reblog with a comment. These aren’t just my suggestions - I want the whole community involved to create an all-encompassing MASSIVE list for Japanese learners at all levels.
- If you have your own reviews, I’ll link them here, too!
- This post will frequently be updated, so check back periodically!

Last Updated: 19/10/2013